What the OIG Wants From You – Compliance Fundamentals

Posted by Frank Strafford on September 27, 2015 in Uncategorized,

5 compliance fundamentals that are guaranteed to grant you favor in the eyes of the OIG - and every other law enforcement agency.

5 compliance fundamentals that are guaranteed to grant you favor in the eyes of the OIG – and every other law enforcement agency.  Essential before your next inspection.

1. Protocol

Compliance officials expect you to have an efficient, comprehensive compliance plan that covers all of your bases, and functions efficiently throughout your organization.  Top notch protocols, especially when supported by cutting-edge software systems, earn you credibility in the eyes of the powers that be – and considerably reduce the likelihood of legal hassles during inspections.

2. Records

Doing your job is one thing; documenting it is quite another.  Every organization needs to maintain clear records of all compliance-related functions; because when the chips are down, your own say-so is not going to cut it.  Paper logs, computer-generated reports, online files – each one has its place, and the well-designed compliance program incorporates the most efficient types of record-keeping, to ensure that every aspect of the compliance program is clearly documented.

3. Due Diligence

Nobody is expected to be perfect; but everybody is expected to do their utmost.  Law enforcement officials want to know that you tried your utmost to follow the law.  And though you can’t know everything, you should be doing your best – whether it means staying up to date on compliance issues yourself, or pulling in experts to help you.

4. Transparency

Law enforcement agencies want to know that you’re not hiding anything.  In addition to maintaining great records, and allowing inspectors access to them, transparency includes the commitment to admitting mistakes – even if it means self-disclosure.  Covering up your bloopers may be tempting; but if a law enforcement agent catches even the slightest whiff of your game, you can expect an unrelenting witch-hunt throughout your organization, followed by the harshest possible penalties.

5. Cooperation

In the event that you do get caught doing something wrong, cooperation is the best policy.  Respect, humility, and a clear desire to cooperate demonstrate your traits of responsibility and contrition – and have the power to considerably soften penalties.

About Frank Strafford

About Frank Strafford

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